How do 9-month-old infants categorize human and ape faces?

Author(s)
Stefanie Peykarjou, Sabina Pauen, Stefanie Hoehl
Abstract

The current study investigates how infants categorize human compared to ape faces. Nine-month-old infants were presented with priming stimuli related to human (N = 24) or ape (N = 25) face targets on different levels of categorization. Event-related potentials were recorded during a passive-looking rapid repetition paradigm. In a within-subjects design, priming effects of the same faces, different faces from the same basic-level category, different faces from the other basic-level category (human/ape faces), and house fronts were examined. Human and ape faces were first categorized on a superordinate level ("faces"), as indicated by enhanced P1 amplitude and reduced P1 latency for faces primed by any faces. Then, human and ape faces were categorized on a basic level. N290 amplitude and latency were larger for human and monkey targets primed by human faces. Neither human nor ape faces were categorized on the individual level.

Organisation(s)
External organisation(s)
Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Journal
Psychophysiology
Volume
51
Pages
866-878
No. of pages
13
ISSN
0048-5772
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.12238
Publication date
09-2014
Peer reviewed
Yes
Austrian Fields of Science 2012
501005 Developmental psychology
Keywords
Portal url
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/en/publications/how-do-9monthold-infants-categorize-human-and-ape-faces(3b075363-c2e6-4e2b-88f6-f7a97ae0cfc8).html